Using NetWare 3.12

book cover

Chapter 13

Implementing Shared Printing


A network is a system designed to provide services and benefits to its users. One of the easiest-to-use and most practical services a network provides is access to shared printers. Just as a printer is usually the first peripheral you buy when you purchase a PC, a printer is probably the first shared peripheral you install when you set up a network.

Shared printing has some compelling benefits. Instead of providing each user with a personal printer, you can provide a few high-quality printers and consolidate your expenditure. A network can make it economically feasible to install a high-speed laser printer because the cost of that printer can be spread over many users.

Sharing makes it possible for network users to have access to a wider variety of printers. If you need to print a graph in full color, you're in luck—as long as your network has a color printer connected.

With NetWare, sharing printers is easy: connecting a printer to the parallel or serial port of a server gives all network users access to the printer. NetWare also enables you to share printers connected to workstations.

In this chapter, you learn how to implement shared printing on your network. The terminology and mechanics of NetWare 3.12's printer sharing are discussed first. You then learn how to create and configure print queues on the servers. You also find out how to configure and activate print servers. Specifically, you study the following aspects of implementing shared printing:

The process of setting up and configuring shared printers is only half the task. In Chapter 14, "Using Shared Printers," you learn how to use and manage NetWare 3.12's printer-sharing features. Before learning about these individual steps, however, you need to understand the printer-sharing process as a whole.

Understanding the Shared-Printing Process

The purpose of the shared-printing process is simple: a print request from a user's workstation must travel to a shared printer. During this journey, the print request passes through several stages you should understand. The next sections follow a typical print request through the printing process.

Step One: Redirecting Printer Output

Print requests start at user workstations. Print jobs usually consist of the output from word processing, spreadsheet, database, and graphics software. Many programs are not aware of network printing; they just send requests to a printer port on a local PC. Other programs, such as WordPerfect, can send output directly to a network queue. Windows and Windows applications also send output to a printer port, but these applications at least are aware that the printer port has been assigned to send output to a network printer.

To use a network printer with programs that aren't network-aware, you execute the NetWare CAPTURE command, which tells the NetWare DOS Requester to "capture" the output that normally would go to a local printer and redirect that output to a selected network printer. You also can use the NetWare User graphical utility to redirect your print output to a shared printer. After you have redirected the print output, the software doing the printing sends output normally. The program is fooled into thinking that a printer is attached directly to your PC.

In addition to enabling you to redirect output to a printer, NetWare 3.12 enables you to control the printer in certain ways. You can use this control to help with both the technical and interpersonal relationship challenges that printer sharing can introduce.

Suppose that one of your shared printers is a laser printer capable of printing vertically (portrait) or horizontally (landscape) on the page. If you send a job to be printed in landscape mode but do not send a command to reset the printer to portrait mode after your print job, the print job after yours may be in landscape orientation also—to the surprise of the person who requested the second print job. You can eliminate this possibility by configuring NetWare 3.12 to automatically send a reset command to the printer before every job.

Step Two: Waiting in a Print Queue

Your NetWare DOS Requester must have a place to send the redirected print output. The Requester cannot safely send the print request directly to the printer because the printer may be off-line, busy with another user's job, or out of paper. The Requester therefore sends your job to a print queue. A print queue is a holding area on a file server disk where print requests are stored. The print requests wait in line (in a queue) for the printer to become available.

Print requests from a workstation are routed to the file server on which the print queue resides. The file server receives the print output from the workstation and converts the information to a file on the server disk. When the print job is finished, its corresponding file on the server is closed and joins the print queue. If no jobs are in the queue ahead of it, the file is sent to the printer immediately. This process is shown in figure 13.1.

NetWare 3.12 provides a wide variety of queue-management and configuration options. Print jobs in a queue waiting to be printed can be moved up in line, deleted, or even partially rerun or restarted to correct paper jams and other problems. If you want to print an extensive job after hours, you can specify that the job be held in the queue until a certain time.

Step Three: Moving from the Queue to the Printer

The last step in the journey is the print job's movement from the print queue to the printer. In many cases, this movement involves going from the queue on the server disk to a printer attached to a port on the server. As you may suspect, NetWare 3.12 enables you to make this process more sophisticated (and complicated). For a particularly busy office, you can arrange for more than one printer to accept print jobs from the same queue (see fig. 13.2). You also can go the other way. You can set up multiple print queues, each with different configuration options, but all serviced by one printer (see fig. 13.3). You can make one of the queues a high-priority queue so that jobs from that queue are always printed as soon as the printer becomes available (even if jobs from other queues were in line first).

The NetWare print server—which runs either on a dedicated workstation or as an NLM (a NetWare Loadable Module) on a NetWare 3.12 server—controls the movement of print jobs from queues to shared printers (see fig. 13.4). The print server, like a police officer directing traffic at a busy intersection, routes jobs to server-connected printers, printers connected to workstations, or printers that come with special ports that connect directly to your network cable system. Connecting printers to servers is not always convenient. You may decide, for example, to keep your network's servers in a centralized and secure location. Thanks to the NetWare print-server module, you can configure workstation-connected or network cable-connected printers to service queues in the same way that printers connected to the file server do.

Certain types of printers or printer-interface adapters have been designed to connect directly to the network cable system instead of to the printer port of a workstation or server. These printers or printer-interface adapters can receive print jobs directly from the queue on a server without requiring a connection to a workstation or server printer port.

Thanks to NetWare 3.12's flexibility, you can connect shared printers to the following:

Setting Up Shared Printing

The first step to implementing shared printing is to plan your shared-printing environment. You must decide how many printers you will share, where they will be located, and how they will connect to the network.

After planning your shared-printing environment, you must prepare the equipment you will use in the shared-printing process. The servers and workstations to which shared printers will be attached must be equipped with parallel and serial ports and printers connected to these ports or to special printer adapters that attach directly to your network cable system. Check to ensure that everything operates normally.

For each shared printer or group of shared printers you plan to implement, you must create and configure three kinds of NetWare items: print queues, printers, and print servers. After creating these items, you assign each print queue to a printer and assign each printer to a print server. You use a utility called PCONSOLE to perform these tasks.

With your printers connected and with the required NetWare print items configured, you are ready to activate your shared printers. You do so by starting the print-server module (called PSERVER) on a NetWare 3.12 server or on a dedicated workstation.

After printers are in place to receive print jobs, you must learn how to use the CAPTURE command or the graphical utilities provided for Windows and OS/2 so that you can redirect printer output to the appropriate print queue. After you have mastered these, you can use PRINTDEF and PRINTCON to improve your control over shared printers by building job profiles that control printer operation.

Finally, you must learn how to manage print jobs while they are waiting to be printed. The PCONSOLE utility is your main tool for this task.

Here are the exact steps you follow to implement shared printing:

1. Plan your shared-printing environment.

2. Prepare your shared-printing hardware.

3. Define and configure print queues and print servers.

4. Assign print queues to print servers.

5. Activate print servers.

These steps are discussed in detail in the remaining sections of this chapter.

Planning Your Shared-Printing Environment

As you implement shared printing, you will be creating and configuring three types of items: print queues, printers, and print servers. You use the PCONSOLE utility to perform these tasks. Before you start PCONSOLE, however, you have to plan the configuration of your shared-printing environment.

You probably know how many printers you plan to share. In addition to knowing how many, you should know what type of connection each printer uses (parallel, serial, or a direct connection to your network cable system) and to what devices the parallel and serial printers are to be connected. Parallel and serial printers can connect to file servers, workstations, or to a dedicated PC running the PSERVER program.

After determining the number of printers to be shared and deciding how you want to connect those printers, you have to decide how many print queues to create. Under normal circumstances, you should create one print queue for every printer; in special situations, however, you may want one printer to service more than one queue, or one queue to be serviced by more than one printer.

Using One Printer for Multiple Queues

Consider first a situation in which having one printer service two queues is useful. Usually, the jobs waiting to be printed are handled on a first-in, first-out basis. Suppose that you have a printer used to print low-priority but lengthy graphics print jobs as well as high-priority text-mode jobs, such as invoices. You want the high-priority print jobs to print as soon as possible, but you want the printer to work on the low-priority graphics jobs when there are no high-priority jobs to print.

Using two print queues, you can implement a less democratic method of prioritizing print jobs so that the more important jobs do not wait for the slower graphics jobs. Set up one queue with a normal priority and another with a high priority. Direct the jobs to be printed as soon as possible to the high-priority queue and direct the graphics jobs to the low-priority queue. A job in the high-priority queue prints as soon as the printer finishes its current job, even if there are jobs already waiting in the low-priority queue.

Using Multiple Printers for One Queue

In some situations, you may want to enable multiple printers to service one queue. Suppose that your network is used to print hundreds of statements at the end of every month, and each statement is one print job. With only one printer, the statements require hours to finish printing. You can double or triple the printing speed by allowing two or three printers to service the queue that stores the statement print jobs. The printers work together on the task—as each printer finishes a job, it looks to the queue to find the next job waiting to be printed.

Defining Print Server Requirements

Although you know that you should create one print queue for every printer (unless you have special cases like those just described), knowing how many print servers to create is not always such an obvious decision. As a general rule, you should create as few print servers as possible to simplify your shared-printing management tasks. A single print server can handle up to 16 shared printers; unless your network is very large, you may require only one print server. Organizational and management considerations also may affect your decision. Each print server must be managed; if the management responsibilities of your network are divided along departmental boundaries, you may want to create one print server for every department.

In addition, take into account the communications layout of your network. If your network encompasses multiple sites linked through low-speed, wide-area network communications lines, you probably want at least one print server running at each site.

Choosing Print Queue and Print Server Operators and Users

For each print server and print queue you create, you must assign users and operators. Print-queue users are allowed to place jobs in the print queue. Print-queue operators can control the queue's operation, deleting or moving jobs in the queue or stopping the flow of jobs into the queue if required. Print-server operators can start or stop the print server or individual printers. Print-server users can monitor the printers controlled by the print server.

With your shared-printer configuration planned, you are ready to prepare your printer hardware and to create and configure print queues, printers, and print servers. You learn how to perform these steps in the next sections.

Guidelines for Planning Your Shared Printing Environment

Observe the following guidelines as you plan your shared-printing configuration:

• Determine how many shared printers you will provide, what type of connection each uses, and the device to which each will be connected.

• Plan to create one print queue for each shared printer, except for special cases in which you need multiple queues serviced by one printer or one queue serviced by multiple printers.

• Determine how many print servers to create based on the hardware available, the division of network-management responsibilities in your organization, and the communication structure of your network. For the sake of manageability, create as few print servers as you can. Each print server can handle 16 printers.

• Choose the users who will be print-queue operators and print-server operators. Choose also the users who will be allowed to use each queue and print server.

Preparing Your Shared-Printing Hardware

After you have planned your configuration, you have to prepare the printers and other hardware that you will use for shared printing. Install the required parallel and serial ports in the file servers, workstations, and dedicated PCs to which you will be connecting shared printers. If you have special hardware that enables a printer to connect directly to a network cable, install and configure the equipment according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

(c)Preparing Print Queues

You’ve already learned that a print queue is a holding area on a server disk. This area stores request files ready to be printed. NetWare’s PCONSOLE utility is the tool you use to create and configure print queues. PCONSOLE enables you to create new queues or to delete or rename existing ones.

Creating Print Queues

To create and configure queues, you must log in with supervisory rights to the server on which you want to work with queues. You then can start PCONSOLE by typing PCONSOLE and pressing Enter. (PCONSOLE is stored in the PUBLIC directory, which is automatically mapped as a search drive.)

PCONSOLE's opening menu offers the following three options:

Begin by selecting Print Queue Information. A list of the current print queues is displayed on-screen (on a newly installed server, no queues exist so none are listed). To create a new print queue, press Ins from PCONSOLE's print queue list. PCONSOLE prompts you to enter a print queue name. Queue names should be brief and descriptive, such as ACCT-LJ (for Accounting department LaserJet) or SALES-132 (for a 132-column wide printer in the Sales department). Type the name you have chosen and press Enter. The print queue list is updated to show your entry.

You also can delete or rename queues shown in the print queues list. To rename a queue, highlight its name and press F3. PCONSOLE prompts you to type the new name. To delete a queue, highlight the name of the queue and press the Del key; you can mark multiple queues by pressing F5 and then delete them by pressing the Del key. The selected queues are deleted.

 


 

Step by Step: Creating, Deleting, and Renaming Print Queues

1. Start PCONSOLE and select Print Queue Information from the main menu. A list of existing print queues appears.

2. To create a new queue, press Ins. You see a prompt that tells you to enter the name of the new queue. When you have entered the name, the new queue is added to the list.

3. To delete a queue, highlight the name of the queue and press Del. After you confirm that you want to delete the queue, the queue is removed from the list.

4. To change a queue name, highlight the name of the queue and press F3. You are prompted to revise the queue name. After you revise the name, the list is updated to show your change.

 


 

Adding Queue Operators and Users

Your main task when configuring a queue is to choose operators and users. Queue operators are permitted to control the flow of print requests through the queue. Operators can delete individual jobs, change the order of jobs, start or stop the queue, prevent new jobs from being placed in the queue, and stop jobs from being sent to printers. Queue users are allowed only to place jobs in the queue.

When you create a new queue, SUPERVISOR is the only user designated as a queue operator; the group EVERYONE is the only queue user. Because all users are members of the group EVERYONE by default, all users are queue users. If a queue you create is used only by a particular department rather than by all server users, make only the users from that department queue users, rather than the group EVERYONE (and perhaps a select few queue operators).

To configure a queue, highlight the name of the queue from PCONSOLE'S queue list and press Enter. The Print Queue Information menu appears (see fig. 13.5). To change the list of queue operators, select Queue Operators. You see a list of the current queue operators. To add a new operator, press the Ins key; a list of all server users and groups appears. Highlight the user you want to add and press Enter; alternatively, mark multiple users and groups by pressing F5 for each user and then press Enter. The list of queue operators returns, updated to show your additions. To delete a queue operator, highlight the name from the Queue Operators list and press the Del key (delete multiple users by marking their names with the F5 key and pressing Del). When your updates are complete, press Esc to return to the Print Queue Information menu.

You can follow similar steps to update the list of queue users. Select Queue Users from the Print Queue Information menu. A list of users appears. The group EVERYONE is listed as the sole queue user. If you want to limit the queue users, first remove the EVERYONE group from the list by highlighting EVERYONE and pressing the Del key. Next, press Ins and, from the resulting list of user and group names, select the users you want to make queue users. When you have finished, press Esc to return to the Print Queue Information menu.

Steps Performed after You Create a Print Server

The final print queue configuration step is to designate which printer or printers will service the queue. You perform this step when you create and configure a print server, which you learn about later in this chapter.

 


 

Step by Step: Configuring Print Queues

1. Start PCONSOLE and select Print Queue Information from the menu. A list of existing print queues appears on-screen.

2. Highlight the name of the queue you want to work with and press Enter. The Print Queue Information menu appears.

3. Select the queue operators: Choose Queue Operators to see a list of the current queue operators. To add a queue operator, press Ins to see a list of all other users and groups. Highlight the name you want to add and press Enter.

4. To remove a queue operator, highlight the name of the operator on the Queue Operators list and press Del.

5. Select the queue users: Choose Queue Users to see a list of the current queue users. To add a queue user, press Ins to see a list of all other users and groups. Highlight the name you want to add and press Enter.

6. To remove a queue user, highlight the name of the user in the Queue Users list and press Del.

7. Assign printers to the queue. You perform this step when you configure a print server.

 


 

Other options on the Print Queue Information menu control the operation of the queue. You learn how to use some of these options later, but first you need to learn about defining a print server.

Preparing Print Servers

Before starting PSERVER, you must define at least one print server. Each print-server definition includes the print server name, password, the queues it services, and up to 16 printers to which the print server can route jobs. As with print queues, you use PCONSOLE to create and configure print servers.

Creating Print Servers

To prepare to create a print server, log in with supervisory access to the server that will run the print server. Start PCONSOLE by typing PCONSOLE and pressing Enter.

From PCONSOLE's main menu, select Print Server Information. A list of all currently defined print servers is displayed on-screen (the list is empty if you haven't yet defined a print server). To create a new definition, press Ins. PCONSOLE prompts you to enter the name of the print server. Because you need to specify the name every time you start the PSERVER print-server module, use a name that is brief and easy to remember. After you enter the name, the print server list is updated.

 


 

Step by Step: Creating a NetWare Print Server

1. Start PCONSOLE and select Print Server Information from the main menu. A list of existing print servers appears on-screen.

2. To create a new print server, press Ins. A prompt tells you to enter the new print server's name. When you enter the name, the new print server is added to the list.

3. To delete a print server, highlight the name of the server and press Del. After you confirm that you want to delete the print server, NetWare removes the server from the list.

4. To change a print server name, highlight the present name and press F3. PCONSOLE prompts you to revise the print server name. After you change the name, the list is updated to show your change.

 


 

Assigning a Print Server Password

The next step in the process of setting up shared printing is to configure the print server. Highlight the name of the server on the print server list and press Enter. The Print Server Information menu is displayed (see fig. 13.6).

The first option on the Print Server Information menu, Change Password, enables you to change the print server's password. When you select this option, PCONSOLE prompts you to enter a new password for the print server. Adding a password to a print server means that you will be prompted to enter the password every time you start the PSERVER print-server module to run your print-server definition. Adding a password is a good way to prevent users from starting the print server from their own workstations—either accidentally or maliciously in order to print jobs secretly to the wrong printer. If network printers are used to print sensitive documents or checks, assigning a password to the print server is a good idea.

Assigning a Full Name

The next option on the Printer Server Information menu, Full Name, enables you to add a full name to the print server's definition. This option, which is similar to adding a full name to a user account with SYSCON, is useful for descriptive purposes. When you select this option, PCONSOLE prompts you to enter a full name for the print server.

Specifying Print Server Operators and Users

Before configuring a print server's printers, you must select which users will be print server operators and which will be print server users. Operators can start and stop the print server and control the server's printers. Operators can perform all print server and printer configuration tasks except changing the list of users and operators. Users can use PCONSOLE to monitor the status of the print server and the server's printers. You don't have to be a print-server user to use one of printers; all that is required is that you be a queue user for one of the queues being serviced by the print server.

When you create a new print server, the SUPERVISOR is the only user designated as a print-server operator. The group EVERYONE is designated as the print-server user (because all users are members of the group EVERYONE by default, all users are print-server users). If you are creating a print server to control the printers used by a particular department and not by all server users, make only the users from that department print-server users (and perhaps a select few print-server operators).

To change the list of print-server operators, select Print Server Operators from the Print Server Information menu. A list of the current print-server operators is displayed on-screen. To add a new operator, press Ins. A list of all eligible users and groups appears. Highlight the user you want to add and press Enter; alternatively, mark multiple users and groups by pressing F5 and then press Enter. The print-server operator list returns to the screen, updated to show your additions. To delete a print-server operator, highlight the name in the Print Server Operators list and press Del (delete multiple users by marking their names with the F5 key and pressing Del). When your updates are complete, press Esc to return to the Print Server Information menu.

You can follow similar steps to update the list of print-server users. Select Print Server Users from the Print Server Information menu. A list of print-server users is displayed. The group EVERYONE is listed as the sole print-server user. If you want to limit the print-server users, first to remove EVERYONE from the list. To do so, highlight EVERYONE and press Del. Then press Ins; from the resulting list of user and group names, select the users you want to designate as print-server users. When you have finished, press Esc to return to the Print Server Information menu.

Configuring a Print Server

The Print Server Configuration option on the Print Server Information menu is where the real work of defining a print server is done. When you select Print Server Configuration, a menu with the following options appears:

Choosing the File Servers to Be Serviced

The first option, File Servers Serviced, enables you to choose as many as seven additional file servers for which the print server can service queues. (If you want your print server to work only with queues on the current file server, don't select this option. The current server is included automatically.) To add file servers to your list, select the File Servers Serviced option; a list of the file servers being serviced is displayed. To add a server to the list, press Ins; a list of all the servers currently running on your network appears on-screen. Highlight the server you want to add and press Enter. When you are finished adding to the list, press Esc to return to the Print Server Configuration menu.

Configuring Printers

The next option you need to select from the Printer Server Configuration menu is Printer Configuration. With this option, you specify up to 16 printers to which the print server can route jobs. When you select Printer Configuration, a list of 16 printers is displayed. If you have not configured any of the printers, they all show the message Not Installed. Highlight the printer number you want to configure and press Enter. A window opens that prompts you through the process of configuring the printer (see fig. 13.7).

Choosing a Printer Name

The first option you configure is the printer name. By default, the printer number is used as the name (such as Printer 0), but you may want to use a name that is more descriptive, such as Third Floor Laser or Warehouse Dot-Matrix. Type the name of your choice; the name can be up to 47 characters long.

Choosing the Printer Connection Type and Communication Settings

After entering the printer name, PCONSOLE prompts you to choose the printer type. Move the highlight to Type and press Enter. A list of printer types appears (see fig. 13.8). You can identify printers connected directly to the server or to a dedicated PC running the PSERVER print-server module by using one of the descriptions that start with Parallel or Serial. Printers connected to workstations are identified by a description starting with Remote. Choose the port description that matches your printer port. NetWare also prompts you to specify whether your printer port uses interrupts and which interrupt is used. If you specify a serial printer, you must enter the printer's communications parameters at the bottom of the window. Enter the baud rate, data bits, stop bits, parity, and X-On/X-Off settings that match your printer's configuration.

Entering the Buffer Size

Another prompt tells you to enter the printer's buffer size. The print-server module maintains a memory buffer to hold information to feed to the printer. A default size of 3K is shown, but you can enter a buffer size from 1K to 20K. If you notice that the printer starts and stops frequently while printing jobs, you may want to increase the size of the printer buffer. If you are concerned about the print-server module's memory consumption on the server, you can decrease the size of each printer buffer.

Configuring Form Handling

Finally, PCONSOLE asks you to specify how the printer should handle forms. A user sending requests to a printer can specify a type of form. If, for example, the printer usually has plain paper loaded and your job must be printed on your company's letterhead, you can specify Letterhead as the form type when you send the job to the queue. When your job is ready to print, the printer stops, and the print server shows that a different form should be loaded. Each form you create is assigned a number (defining forms is described in Chapter 14).

You can specify two options concerning forms. First, you can designate the Starting Form number. From that point forward, the print server assumes by default that this form type is loaded; it stops printing only when a different form number is called for. Second, you can specify how the print server handles form changes by moving the highlight to Queue Service Mode and pressing Enter. A window displays the following choices:

• Change Forms as Needed

• Minimize Form Changes across Queues

• Minimize Form Changes within Queues

• Service Only Currently Mounted Form

The default mode is Change Forms as Needed, which means that the print server stops printing and prompts for a form change every time a job with a different form number is ready to print. If you select one of the options starting with Minimize Form Changes, the print server prints all jobs with the currently loaded form type before requesting a change. (Minimizing changes across queues means that the printer prints all jobs from all queues that call for the current form type. Minimizing changes within queues means that all jobs within the highest priority queue with the same form type are printed before a job requesting a form change is printed, regardless of which job was first in line.) Service Only Currently Mounted Form instructs the print server to print all jobs that call for the current form type, but not to print jobs that call for another form type. Printing does not stop, and you do not receive a prompt.

After you have defined the printer, press Esc to save your definition. The printer list returns to the screen. Repeat the configuration steps for every printer you need to define. If you want to delete a defined printer, highlight the name of the printer in the printer list and press Del. When you are finished working with the printer list, press Esc to return to the Print Server Configuration menu.

Creating the Printer Notification List

If you want someone to be notified automatically when the printer needs attention—when the printer needs more paper or a form change, for example—select the Notify List for Printer option from the Print Server Configuration menu. A list of the defined printers appears. Select the one for which you want to create a notification list. A blank list is displayed on-screen. To add a user to the list, press Ins. You see a list of all users and groups (see fig. 13.9). Select the user or group you want to add. PCONSOLE prompts you to specify how quickly, in seconds, the user should be notified when a problem arises, and how frequently the user is to be notified thereafter. Implement this feature with caution—having your work interrupted by a printer-attention notice every minute or so may begin to seem like torture. As a general rule, users go to the printer to check on their jobs shortly after sending them. As a result, many problems are quickly identified without notification.

Assigning the Printer to a Print Queue

The final step in configuring the print server is deciding which queues are to be serviced by each printer. As previously discussed, one queue can be serviced by multiple printers, or one printer can service multiple queues. To assign a printer to a queue, select Queues Serviced by Printer from the Print Server Configuration menu. A list of the print server's printers is displayed on-screen. When you select the printer you want to assign to a queue, a list of the queues (if any) that the printer is currently servicing appears. To add a queue, press Ins; you see a list of queues. Highlight the queue you want to add and press Enter.

PCONSOLE prompts you to assign a priority to that queue. This priority determines how the printer services this queue in relation to how it services other queues. Print requests in queues with a higher priority are printed first. Enter the priority number that you want to assign, using a number between 1 and 10 (the default priority for all queue/printer relationships is 1, which is the highest priority). The queue is updated to include the queue you have added.

Repeat this process if you want to assign this printer to other queues. Otherwise, press Esc to save your changes and return to the list of print-server printers. If you need to assign queues to another printer, highlight the name of that printer, press Enter, and repeat the steps to select a queue.

When you have finished assigning printers to queues, press Esc to return to the printer list; press Esc again to return to the Print Server Configuration menu. At this point, you should be finished configuring your print server, so press Esc once more to return to the Print Server Information menu.

One important option on the Print Server Information menu has not yet been described. The Print Server Status/Control selection enables you to control the operation of the print server and that server's printers. This option appears only if a print server is currently running. Chapter 14, "Using Shared Printers," describes the Print Server Status/Control selection.

You now have completely defined a print server—and that server is ready to manage printers and send them print requests from queues. In the next section, you learn about starting the print-server module and sending print requests to it.

 


 

Step by Step: Configuring a NetWare Print Server

1. Start PCONSOLE and select Print Server Information from the main menu. A list of existing print servers appears.

2. Highlight the server you want to work with and press Enter. The Print Server Information menu appears.

3. If you want to assign a password to the print server, select Change Password and then enter a password.

4. Select the print server full name: Select Full Name and enter a full name.

5. Select the print-server operators: Choose Print Server Operators to see a list of the current print-server operators. To add an operator, press Ins to see a list of all other users and groups, highlight the name you want to add, and press Enter. To remove an operator, highlight the name from the Print Server Operators list and press Del.

6. Select the print-server users by choosing Print Server Users to see a list of the current print-server users. To add a user, press Ins. You see a list of all other users and groups. Highlight the name you want to add and press Enter.

7. To remove a user, highlight the name of the user from the Print Server Users list and press Del.

8. Specify the file servers whose queues the print server can service. Choose Print Server Configuration and, from the resulting Print Server Configuration menu, choose File Servers Serviced. You see a list of the file servers whose queues the print server can service. To add a server, press Ins and select a file server name from the resulting list.

9. To remove a file server, highlight the name of the server and press Del.

10. To configure the print-server printers, choose Printer Configuration from the Print Server Configuration menu. A list of the 16 available printer assignments appears, numbered from 0 to 15. Highlight the number of the printer you want to configure and press Enter. A window opens that prompts you to enter the printer name, port type (such as Parallel LPT1, Serial COM2, Remote Parallel LPT1, or Remote Serial COM3), and other parameters. To save your changes when you are finished, press Esc and return to the list of printer numbers.

11. Configure other printers as needed. Then press Esc until the Printer Configuration menu returns to the screen.

12. Match printers to queues: From the Printer Configuration menu, choose Queues Serviced by Printers. The printers you defined in the preceding step are listed. Select a printer; you see a list of the queues that printer services. Press Ins to list file servers and queues from which you can pick a queue to place on the list. A prompt tells you to assign a priority level from 1 to 10 to the queue/printer combination.

13. Remove a queue from the printer's list by highlighting the queue and pressing Del.

14. Press Esc to return to the printer list. You then can match other printers to queues, or press Esc to return to the Printer Configuration menu.

15. 10. Select a notification list for the printer. From the Printer Configuration menu, choose Notify List for Printer. The printers you have previously defined are listed. Select a printer from this list. You see a list of the users that printer notifies when it needs attention. Press Ins to see a list of additional users and groups from which you can pick a new name. PCONSOLE prompts you to specify notification intervals in seconds. Remove a user or group from the printer's notification list by highlighting the name of the user or group and pressing Del.

16. Press Esc to return to the printer list. You can set up notification lists for other printers, or you can press Esc to return to the Printer Configuration menu. Press Esc until you return to PCONSOLE's main menu.

 


 

Activating Print Servers

After you have set up a print-server definition, you are ready to use the server with the PSERVER program. You can run PSERVER as an NLM from the server console or from a dedicated workstation. While PSERVER is running with your print-server definition, the program continuously checks the queues assigned to your print server's printers for new print requests. Any new request that appears is directed to the appropriate printer. Whenever you add a new printer or queue to the print-server definition, you must stop and restart PSERVER so that the new information can become effective.

Starting PSERVER at the NetWare Server Console

To start PSERVER with your print-server definition from the server console, go to the server colon prompt and type the following:

• LOAD PSERVER PSNAME

(Substitute the name of your print server for PSNAME.) If you assigned a password to the print server, you are prompted to enter it. After entering the password, you see the Print Server Status screen (see fig. 13.10), which displays the name and current status of each printer. You can toggle between the displays for printers 0 through 7 and 8 through 15 by pressing Esc.

You can ensure that automatic startup takes place when you start the file server by adding the preceding command to your server's AUTOEXEC.NCF file. The easiest way to add this command is to load the INSTALL NLM by typing LOAD INSTALL and pressing Enter from the server console's colon prompt. From the INSTALL NLM main menu, select System Options; from the resulting menu, select the Edit AUTOEXEC.NCF File option.

Starting PSERVER on a Dedicated PC

You also can run PSERVER on a dedicated PC. A PC running PSERVER, however, can be used for no other purpose while PSERVER is active. Before running the program, you must customize the PC's NetWare DOS Requester to increase the number of allowed SPX connections. Add the following section heading and option line to the NET.CFG file:

Protocol IPXODI
SPX CONNECTIONS=60

If you already have a Protocol IPXODI section in your NET.CFG file, add the SPX CONNECTIONS=60 statement to that section (you learned about the NetWare DOS Requester and the NET.CFG file in Chapter 7, "Activating Workstations"). Reboot the workstation and reload the NetWare DOS Requester.

Log in to the server where you defined your print server and type the following command:

• PSERVER PSNAME

(Substitute the name of your print server for PSNAME.) If you assigned a password to the print server, PSERVER prompts you to enter that password. After you enter the password, the Print Server Status screen appears, showing the name and current status of each printer. You can toggle between the displays for printers 0 through 7 and 8 through 15 by pressing Esc.

Starting a Workstation-Based Shared Printer

If one or more of the printers defined in your print-server definition is a remote printer, you can activate the printer by using the RPRINTER command. RPRINTER runs as a memory-resident program on a workstation, enabling the sharing of the printer or printers connected to the workstation. Even with RPRINTER running, you can continue to use the workstation normally.

As with PSERVER on a workstation, you must customize the NetWare DOS Requester to increase the number of SPX connections. Customize the PC's NetWare DOS Requester to increase the number of allowed SPX connections by adding the following section heading and option line to the NET.CFG file:

Protocol IPXODI
SPX CONNECTIONS=60

If you already have a Protocol IPXODI section in your NET.CFG file, add the SPX CONNECTIONS=60 statement to that section. Reboot the workstation and reload the NetWare DOS Requester.

Make sure that the print server where you defined remote printers is active. Log in to the server where your print server is defined, type RPRINTER, and press Enter. A menu appears and prompts you to choose the print server and the remote printer you want to activate on that print server. After activating the remote printer, you can use it as a shared printer for users who have been assigned the right to put jobs in a queue that the printer services.

If you want to activate the printer automatically without using menus (if you want to activate the printer from a batch file, for example), you can type the following and press Enter:

• RPRINTER PSNAME x

Substitute the name of your print server for PSNAME, and the number of the printer you are activating for x.

RPRINTER is a memory-resident program that manages the remote printer's communications with the print server. You can run multiple shared printers on one workstation by executing the RPRINTER command for each printer. Each printer you activate uses approximately 6K of memory.

To deactivate a shared printer, type the following command and press Enter:

• RPRINTER PSNAME x -R

Again, substitute the name of your print server for PSNAME and the number of the printer you are deactivating for x. The 6K of memory occupied by RPRINTER for that printer is freed. Be careful to ensure that no other memory-resident programs loaded after RPRINTER are still loaded when you remove RPRINTER.

If you shut down a PC running RPRINTER without first deactivating RPRINTER, you may have difficulty when you attempt to reload RPRINTER upon restarting the PC. Until the print server senses that the original RPRINTER connection is no longer active (which by default can take as long as 30 seconds), it does not allow another RPRINTER session for the same printer to be reestablished.

You can solve this problem by running the RPRINTER command, which deactivates the RPRINTER connection. The RPRINTER command forces the print server to terminate the previous RPRINTER session.

If you have placed in your AUTOEXEC.BAT a command to load RPRINTER to activate a shared workstation connection, consider also placing in AUTOEXEC.BAT the corresponding command to deactivate the printer. Place the command to deactivate before the command to activate for those instances when you have to reboot your computer unexpectedly. The deactivate command automatically cleans up the previous RPRINTER session.

Running RPRINTER on a Windows PC

If you wish to use RPRINTER on a workstation running Windows, start RPRINTER from the DOS prompt before you start Windows. Do not attempt to unload RPRINTER until after you have exited Windows.

Designating a Default Queue

You can perform one final, optional, step to configure shared printing for NetWare. To accommodate users who want simple access to a shared printer, you can define a default printer for users who use the NetWare CAPTURE command to redirect their printer output but do not use CAPTURE's parameters to specify a queue. From the server console colon prompt, type the following and press Enter:

• SPOOL 0 TO ACCT-LJ

Substitute your queue name for ACCT-LJ. This default printer setup enables users to redirect printed output to the ACCT-LJ queue without knowing how to specify the queue name.

You probably will want to set this default automatically when you start the file server. You can ensure that this default is set by adding the preceding command to your server's AUTOEXEC.NCF file. The easiest way to add the default is to load the INSTALL NLM. Type LOAD INSTALL and press Enter from the server console's colon prompt. From INSTALL's main menu, select System Options; from the resulting menu select the Edit AUTOEXEC.NCF File option.

Summary

In this chapter, you learned how to create and configure queues and how to activate print servers and printers. Now you are ready to learn how to use them. In the next chapter, you learn how to send print requests to the queues and shared printers you have activated and how to manage them along the way.


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Keywords:
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